Dog Diarrhea Newark, California

 

How Long Should I Wait to Call the Vet if My Dog Has Diarrhea?


Diarrhea is a common problem in dogs, often because they will put almost anything in their mouth. But it can also be caused by more serious health problems. Some of these issues require close attention, especially if the diarrhea is severe or occurs frequently. Loose stools are, of course, the main indicator of diarrhea. Diarrhea may also be accompanied by vomiting , loss of appetite, weight loss, abdominal pain, lethargy and other symptoms of disease. Acute diarrhea (appears suddenly) in an otherwise healthy dog is often due to dietary indiscretion (scavenging or eating food outside their diet like food scraps ); stress; a sudden change in diet (switching their food without a transition period); or viral, bacterial or parasitic infections.

 

At-Home Treatment for Acute Diarrhea With Vomiting in Dogs

For dogs with diarrhea who have vomited only once or twice: Remove all food for 8-12 hours. To avoid dehydration, offer your dog small amounts of water frequently throughout the day. If needed, you can also offer some dilute, low-sodium chicken or beef broth or Pedialyte in addition to water. When your dog has not vomited for at least 8-12 hours, offer a small amount of boiled, white- meat chicken (no bones, skin or spices) and white rice. Wait two hours. If your dog has not vomited during this period, then you can offer another small meal of cooked chicken and rice. Continue this bland diet for 1-3 days, gradually increasing the amount of food offered at each meal and lengthening the time between meals until the stool consistency returns to normal.

You will need to do a gradual transition back to your dog’s typical diet in order to avoid another gastrointestinal upset. If the diarrhea continues for more than 24 hours or your dog’s condition worsens at any time, call your vet immediately.

Diagnosis for Dogs With Diarrhea

If your dog suffers from frequent liquid bowel movements, or the current attack is severe and/or associated with vomiting, lethargy, abdominal pain or weight loss, make an appointment with a veterinarian. Diagnosing the cause of dog diarrhea can sometimes be as easy as running a simple fecal exam. But sometimes, it can be challenging and require different procedures such as blood work, abdominal X-rays or ultrasound, endoscopy, or exploratory surgery.

Will a Dog Get Diarrhea?

Here are several ways to reduce the occurrence of diarrhea in dogs:
Do not suddenly change your dog’s diet.
Do not give your dog bones as toys (firm, rubber chew toys are a better choice).
Do not let your dog play with small objects that could be swallowed.
Do not feed your dog table scraps.
Do not allow your dog to scavenge.
Always keep your dog up-to-date with deworming and vaccinations.
Learn how to properly use a bland diet to treat a dog with diarrhea .

Many things can disrupt this well-balanced system, causing diarrhea or, less frequently, constipation. Some things, like eating too much grass , are not serious at all. Others can be a sign of a life-threatening problem, such as an indigestible object (like a rock) lodged in the stomach, or a disease like cancer. There are many reasons why a dog may develop loose stools, but most cases may be attributed to one of these 12 triggers:

Dietary indiscretion: Eating too much, eating garbage, or spoiled food. There’s actually a name for it in veterinary circles—“garbage toxicosis” or “garbage gut.”
Change in diet: It may take a few days for a dog’s digestive system to adapt to new proteins. That’s why many dog-food manufacturers recommend that you go slow when you switch from one brand of food to another.
Food intolerance
Allergies Parasites : Most of these will cause illness in puppies or in adults with weak immune systems: Roundworms Hookworms Whipworms Coccidia Giardia Poisonous substances or plants
Swallowing an indigestible foreign body , like a toy or a dozen or more socks
Infections with common viruses such as: Parvovirus Distemper Coronavirus
Bacterial infections , such as salmonella
Illnesses , such as kidney and liver disease, colitis, inflammatory bowel disease , and cancer
Antibiotics and other medications
Stress or emotional upset

What causes diarrhea? Diarrhea is the result of faster movement of fecal material through the intestine, combined with decreased absorption of water, nutrients, and electrolytes. If the main sign of illness in your dog is diarrhea, a relatively simple problem such as an intestinal infection from bacteria, viruses, coccidia, or intestinal worms may be the cause.

Recent Diet Changes

One of the most common causes of diarrhea is a recent dietary change. Many pet owners may not realize that it takes several days for a dog’s digestive system to adjust to a new food. In more cases than not, if the new food isn’t slowly introduced into the dog’s diet, it will likely cause diarrhea. This often occurs when pet parents begin to transition their pup to an all-natural or a raw food diet . You can imagine that a dog who has eaten dry kibble their whole life will likely experience quite a shock when making such a big change. Experts advise to slowly introduce the new food, a little at a time, by mixing it in with the dog’s current food, until the old food has been entirely transitioned out.

Bad Eating Habits
Another extremely common cause of dog diarrhea is bad dietary habits. Most dogs enjoy eating just about everything, including things that they definitely shouldn’t be putting into their mouths. This includes garbage, spoiled food, and feces. Bad dietary habits also include overeating. All of these things can lead to an upset stomach, gas, or diarrhea. If your dog’s diet is full of processed chemicals, high sugar and salt content, and fatty foods, you’ll likely notice signs of a disruption in the balance of their digestive system. This disruption often leads to diarrhea. Additionally, dog owners must recognize when they are contributing to their dog’s bad eating habits. We all want our dogs to be happy, and when Fido gives you those big puppy eyes, it can be hard to say no. However, feeding your dog table scraps can quickly lead to a bout of diarrhea (or worse!). Feeding your dog table scraps can also lead to a number of behavioral issues, not to mention harmful side effects. For these reasons, among others, we recommend withholding table scraps and keeping your dog solely on a species appropriate diet .

Furthermore, too many commercial dog treats can also lead to diarrhea. Treats should be given sparingly, not multiple times a day. They should also be of high quality (i.e. all-natural, non-GMO, and soy-free.

Food Intolerance

Many dogs with food intolerance struggle with diarrhea and gas on a consistent basis. All dog breeds can have hypersensitivities to food that are rich in gluten, fat, and dairy. However, some specific dog breeds are more prone to these hypersensitivities. For instance, some Wheaten Terriers and Irish Setters are known to have gluten intolerances. On the other hand, some Schnauzers are known to be hypersensitive to diets that have a high fat content. Knowing specific characteristics that are tied to your dog’s breed can help determine underlying health conditions before they develop. Unfortunately, it can be rather difficult to figure out exactly what your dog is unable to tolerate. However, once it is determined, it should be consistently avoided.

Chronic (or long-term) diarrhea and digestive issues can lead to further problems in the future. Therefore, pet parents should consider adding foods and supplements that will help to ease the digestive system such as increased fiber, probiotics, etc.

Parasites

Here is where things get a bit scary. While diarrhea can be the result of something relatively minor, it can also be an underlying sign of more serious conditions. Intestinal parasites like hookworms, roundworms, giardia, and coccidia can lead to severe stomach problems. Typically, dogs contract parasites by drinking contaminated water, or otherwise ingesting contaminated soil or stool. Puppies and dogs with weakened immune systems are also at a higher risk. In many cases, parasitic infestation can be difficult to detect. If for any reason you believe that your dog may have intestinal parasites, take them to the vet for a fecal exam and proper diagnosis. Only then can an effective treatment plan be implemented.

Consuming Foreign Objects

With small intestinal diarrhea , you’re likely to see large amounts of stool that range from very watery to semi-formed. Defecation frequency is often normal, but could be slightly increased. Stool that is extremely dark or black suggests bleeding may be occurring in the stomach or the first part of the small intestine. Flatulence (gas), stomach or intestinal noises, or vomiting may occur at the same time.

Poisonous Substances or Toxic Plants

Be aware that intestinal obstruction resulting from ingestion of toys or bones can be associated with intense pain, vomiting and straining to defecate but passing only small amounts of watery stool, often with blood. An obstruction is a true emergency that requires immediate attention and treatment.

When in doubt or when concerned about your furry friend’s diarrhea, give your veterinarian a quick call. Your veterinarian can determine whether the problem is urgent based on the history and description you provide. He or she can also provide the best advice on how you can manage your dog’s health.

Bacterial and Viral Infections

Other worrisome conditions that may lead to loose stool include bacterial and viral infections. Parvovirus, distemper, coronavirus, and bacterial infections such as salmonella are often accompanied by severe diarrhea. If your dog also has a fever, is vomiting, has muscle weakness, and is more lethargic than usual, they may have a bacterial or viral infection. In most cases, infections are highly contagious. This is troublesome in a home with other pets, because of the nature of uncontrollable, explosive diarrhea. Pet parents should make sure to quarantine the affected dog from other pets and be careful when cleaning up any bodily fluids. Some infections can be transmitted to humans as well.

Illnesses or Disease

Probably the most common complaint received by veterinarians is that of diarrhea. It’s such an easy condition to identify: The smell is unmistakable, as is its chocolate-pudding appearance. Most of the time, diarrhea is caused by a dietary indiscretion or stressful circumstances, and is self-limiting. Diarrhea is not a disease; rather, it is a symptom of a dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). When associated with bad food or food-borne pathogens, diarrhea serves to rapidly remove pathogens from the GIT before they have a chance to be absorbed and cause more damage.

Antibiotics or Medications

While antibiotics treat infections, they’re can also lead to diarrhea in your dog. In fact, gastrointestinal (GI) issues are one of the most common side effects of many antibiotics. Antibiotics treat infections by killing the bad bacteria in your dog’s body. However, antibiotics are not able to differentiate between good bacteria and bad bacteria. Therefore, they, unfortunately, target both. Good bacteria are necessary for a proper balance in the digestive system and GI tract. Without good bacteria, your dog will likely experience abdominal pain and other stomach issues. If your dog has recently been put on antibiotics, their diarrhea may be linked to the new medication. Always follow the advice of your vet – many times, the medication should be given with food.

Anxiety, Stress, or Emotional Distress

We probably don’t have to tell you that dogs are highly sensitive creatures. They experience highs and lows just like humans do. If you have ever felt so anxious that you are physically sick to your stomach then you know firsthand just how a dog with anxiety might feel. Stress can be directly linked to irregular bowel movements that can cause either constipation or loose stools. A good rule of thumb is that if something is stressing you out, Fido is likely picking up on it.

What Your Dog’s Poop Mean

It’s not a topic anyone likes to discuss, but if you own a dog, chances are you have found yourself cleaning up a stinking brown puddle (or, politely put, doggie runs) more than you’d care to think about. Diarrhea is a common canine affliction and it varies in frequency, duration, and intensity from dog to dog. You may not be able to totally prevent diarrhea, but knowing as much as possible about it might help limit the number times your dog has one of these unpleasant episodes and reduce the duration when the runs do come.

Time for a Vet Visit

What is diarrhea? Diarrhea is unformed or loose stools, usually occurring in larger amounts and/or more often. Diarrhea is not a disease but rather a sign of many different diseases. Diarrhea associated with minor conditions can often be resolved quickly with simple treatments. “Diarrhea may be the result of serious or life-threatening illnesses.” However, diarrhea may be the result of serious or life-threatening illnesses such as organ system failure or cancer. Even diarrhea caused by mild illnesses may become serious if treatment is not begun early enough to prevent severe dehydration and electrolyte imbalance.

At one point or another, every dog could experience a bout of diarrhea. In most cases, it isn’t a cause for total panic. If you have recently changed Fido’s diet, or if your dog has been getting extra treats from the dinner table, these factors might be clues to the culprit. However, there are certain things that you, as a pet parent, need to be aware of and keep an eye on. A great many cases are mild and, with your vet’s advice, may be treated without a trip to the office. There are many at-home remedies including rice water and pumpkin. You may need to consult a vet if your dog exhibits other symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea does not stop, the dog is on a new medication, or things just don’t seem right. You know your dog, and only you know the subtle signs that something is wrong. Respect your instincts and if you think you need veterinary guidance, pick up the phone.

Dog diarrhea that is accompanied by vomiting, blood, or mucus can be early signs of much more critical conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease , liver disease , or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Your vet would need to do specific tests to diagnose these conditions. These conditions should not be overlooked or ignored. If they are left untreated, they can lead to dehydration and a slew of health problems further down the road. Let’s talk about why you might not want to go to the vet right away.

If you take your dog to a conventional vet for diarrhea, they’ll usually give you antibiotics … like Metronidazole (Flagyl). It will stop your dog’s symptoms in a few doses.

The trouble is … that’s all it does. It stops symptoms without fixing the underlying issue. So the diarrhea comes back. Antibiotics are not the best solution. In fact they can do more harm to your dog’s gut. And that harm can be permanent … so your dog’s gut never recovers.

In order to prevent the development of serious conditions, familiarize yourself with the warning signs below.
Warning Signs Include:

Diarrhea that lasts for over 48 hours
Black tarry stool or bloody diarrhea
Loss of appetite Increased lethargy Vomiting
Fever
Dehydration
Abdominal discomfort and/or increased sensitivity in the abdominal region (often seen as whining, panting, excessive drooling, or a distended abdomen –

Note well: If you notice these signs of bloat specifically, please consider this an emergency and take your dog to the vet as quickly as possible, as the condition can be potentially life-threatening.) If you notice any of the symptoms listed above, it is time to see a vet.

How to Stop Diarrhea

A great many cases are mild and, with your vet’s advice, may be treated without a trip to the office. They may respond to a regimen of very basic treatments, including: Fasts Withholding food for 12 to 24 hours, and providing water in small amounts frequently, can clear the cause of the upset and allow the gastrointestinal tract to settle. It’s usually the first line of attack for the runs. Before you decide on a fast, be sure that your dog is healthy enough to endure it. Puppies, and elderly dogs, for example, need nutrients. Also, a fast may not be appropriate for little dogs, who do not have the physical reserves of their larger cousins.

In most cases, switching to a bland diet is the first step to treating the condition.

Medication for Dog Diarrhea

Antidiarrheal agents, dewormers and or probiotics (bacteria that support intestinal health) may be prescribed in some cases. Metronidazole (brand name Flagyl®) and tylosin (brand name Tylan®) are commonly prescribed anti-diarrheal agents that decrease the intestinal inflammation that often leads to diarrhea. Dewormers commonly used include Panacur®, Drontal®, and Dolpac®.

Natural Home Remedies for Diarrhea

Additionally, there are several wonderful home remedies that have proven time and time again to be effective in relieving diarrhea.

Boiled Chicken & White Rice

One of the oldest tricks in the book is feeding your dog a bland diet of boiled chicken and white rice. It tends to work the majority of the time, when it comes to stopping diarrhea. Dog owners should make sure that there aren’t any additives in either the chicken or the rice. Simplicity is key!

Canned Pumpkin

Canned pumpkin is great at soothing upset stomachs. Pumpkin can be absorbed slowly by the body. This slow absorption makes it a great remedy for both constipation and diarrhea. (*We want to make sure that pet parents are aware that canned pumpkin is NOT pumpkin pie mix! Be sure you are purchasing the right product!)

Ginger
Ginger is very effective in promoting and maintaining a healthy GI tract. Additionally, ginger acts as an anti-inflammatory that can also help to fight nausea, bloat, and arthritis.

Alternative Treatments

Some manufacturers offer foods that can soothe stomach problems. You may need to obtain these from your vet. Over-the-counter medications for humans may also be effective for doggie diarrhea, but should be given with caution and you should talk to your vet before using them. Methods that work for one dog may not help another, so you might need to do a little experimentation to find the right formula. It might also be helpful to write down what works and what doesn’t so you’ll know what to do the next time you find yourself mopping up a mess. Once you find a recovery diet that agree with your dog, and doesn’t cause a relapse, you can slowly increase the portions over a period of days, and then start to add small quantities of your dog’s regular food, until things are back to normal.
If diarrhea is the only sign, a minimum number of tests are performed to rule out certain parasites and infections. If diarrhea is severe or associated with several other clinical signs, your veterinarian will perform a series of tests in order to reach a diagnosis and to determine how sick your dog has become as a consequence of the diarrhea. These tests enable your veterinarian to treat your dog appropriately. Diagnostic tests may include microscopic fecal evaluation, X-rays with or without barium (a liquid given to dogs that shows up on X-rays and can highlight abnormalities in the intestine), blood tests, fecal cultures or DNA tests, biopsies of the intestinal tract, endoscopy, ultrasound, and exploratory abdominal surgery.

 

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