Dog Diarrhea Waterford, Connecticut

 

How Long Should I Wait to Call the Vet if My Dog Has Diarrhea?


Chronic diarrhea can be caused by dietary allergies or intolerances , stress, some types of parasites (e.g., Giardia , hookworms , roundworms and whipworms ), bacterial infections, pancreatic disease, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome , some types of cancer, and diseases outside of the gastrointestinal tract (e.g., liver failure or heart disease). These types of health issues will need to be discussed with your veterinarian and can require prescription medication.

 

At-Home Treatment for Acute Diarrhea in Dogs
For healthy adult dogs who have mild diarrhea with no other symptoms:

Make sure your dog has access to plenty of clean water to avoid dehydration . Encourage your dog to drink. If needed, offer dilute, low-sodium chicken or beef broth or Pedialyte in addition to the water. Give your dog a small meal of boiled, white-meat chicken (no bones or skin) and white rice—you can also use sweet potato or pumpkin instead of rice. (Pumpkin and sweet potato can also be added to your dog’s regular diet to increase their fiber intake.) You can give this diet to your dog until their stool consistency returns to normal. If your dog has chicken allergies, you should replace the protein with a hypoallergenic option.

If the diarrhea continues for more than 24 hours or your dog’s condition worsens at any time, call your vet immediately.

Diagnosis for Dogs With Diarrhea

If your dog suffers from frequent liquid bowel movements, or the current attack is severe and/or associated with vomiting, lethargy, abdominal pain or weight loss, make an appointment with a veterinarian. Diagnosing the cause of dog diarrhea can sometimes be as easy as running a simple fecal exam. But sometimes, it can be challenging and require different procedures such as blood work, abdominal X-rays or ultrasound, endoscopy, or exploratory surgery.

Will a Dog Get Diarrhea?

Here are several ways to reduce the occurrence of diarrhea in dogs:
Do not suddenly change your dog’s diet.
Do not give your dog bones as toys (firm, rubber chew toys are a better choice).
Do not let your dog play with small objects that could be swallowed.
Do not feed your dog table scraps.
Do not allow your dog to scavenge.
Always keep your dog up-to-date with deworming and vaccinations.
Learn how to properly use a bland diet to treat a dog with diarrhea .


Diarrhea is a common canine affliction and it varies in frequency, duration, and intensity from dog to dog. There are many reasons why a dog may develop loose stools, but most cases may be attributed to 12 triggers:

Dietary indiscretion
Change in diet
Food intolerance
Allergies
Parasites
Poisonous substances or plants
Swallowing an indigestible foreign body
Infections with common viruses
Bacterial infections
Illnesses
Antibiotics and other medications
Stress or emotional upset

How serious is diarrhea in dogs? The seriousness of diarrhea depends on how long the diarrhea has persisted and how many other signs accompany the diarrhea. If your dog has severe bloody diarrhea, or is showing more generalized signs of illness such as weakness, fever, vomiting, abdominal pain, or loss of appetite, or if dehydration accompanies the diarrhea, the cause may be more serious. For example, diarrhea is one of the first signs seen in parvovirus, a viral infection that can cause life-threatening illness in susceptible dogs.

Recent Diet Changes

In dogs, dietary indiscretion (eating garbage or other offensive or irritating materials), or a change in diet is a common cause of acute (sudden) diarrhea. Stress, especially following travel, boarding, or other changes in environment, can also cause acute diarrhea. However, diarrhea can also be a sign of a more serious underlying disorder such as allergies, bacterial or viral infections, inflammatory intestinal disease, organ dysfunction, or other systemic illness.

Bad Eating Habits
Another extremely common cause of dog diarrhea is bad dietary habits. Most dogs enjoy eating just about everything, including things that they definitely shouldn’t be putting into their mouths. This includes garbage, spoiled food, and feces. Bad dietary habits also include overeating. All of these things can lead to an upset stomach, gas, or diarrhea. If your dog’s diet is full of processed chemicals, high sugar and salt content, and fatty foods, you’ll likely notice signs of a disruption in the balance of their digestive system. This disruption often leads to diarrhea. Additionally, dog owners must recognize when they are contributing to their dog’s bad eating habits. We all want our dogs to be happy, and when Fido gives you those big puppy eyes, it can be hard to say no. However, feeding your dog table scraps can quickly lead to a bout of diarrhea (or worse!). Feeding your dog table scraps can also lead to a number of behavioral issues, not to mention harmful side effects. For these reasons, among others, we recommend withholding table scraps and keeping your dog solely on a species appropriate diet .

Furthermore, too many commercial dog treats can also lead to diarrhea. Treats should be given sparingly, not multiple times a day. They should also be of high quality (i.e. all-natural, non-GMO, and soy-free.

Food Intolerance

For example, when your canine companion eats something that’s not part of his or her normal diet, the normal bacteria present in the intestines may be changed, which can lead to acute diarrhea. Diarrhea can also signal health problems such as pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), parvovirus infection and liver disease. In these cases, inflammation and/or damage to the intestinal lining are the mechanisms behind the diarrhea.

Chronic (or long-term) diarrhea and digestive issues can lead to further problems in the future. Therefore, pet parents should consider adding foods and supplements that will help to ease the digestive system such as increased fiber, probiotics, etc.

Allergies

Food allergies are another possible cause of diarrhea in dogs, as they commonly lead to an array of symptoms. Allergic reactions may vary in severity. However, if a severe reaction occurs, veterinary intervention will be necessary. Hopefully, the allergic reaction will simply cause an upset stomach. If that is the case, the next step is determining the exact allergen. Again, this can be relatively tricky. Experts recommend a food elimination diet. This entails starting from scratch and slowly re-introducing foods to determine the underlying cause of the reaction. Furthermore, certain foods tend to cause more allergic reactions than others. The most common culprits are pork, rabbit, beef, dairy, wheat, egg, chicken, lamb, soy, and fish. However, all pups are unique. For example, some dogs may be allergic to poultry, but not beef. If your dog has diarrhea, a quick test may entail simply switching out the meat content.

Consuming Foreign Objects

With small intestinal diarrhea , you’re likely to see large amounts of stool that range from very watery to semi-formed. Defecation frequency is often normal, but could be slightly increased. Stool that is extremely dark or black suggests bleeding may be occurring in the stomach or the first part of the small intestine. Flatulence (gas), stomach or intestinal noises, or vomiting may occur at the same time.

Poisonous Substances or Toxic Plants

If you have not changed your dog’s food or dietary habits, unexplainable changes in your dog’s poop are typically the first symptoms of poisoning. Shortly after your dog has consumed a toxic substance, stomach pain and diarrhea may ensue. Ingesting poisonous substances is extremely dangerous and can cause severe conditions if left untreated. A detoxification process will need to be conducted ASAP. If for any reason you feel that your dog has ingested a toxic substance, such as lead-based products or poisonous plants, or even some household products, it is important to get them to the veterinarian straight away. Toxic substances also include things such as chocolate, mushrooms, human medications, laundry detergents, charcoal, as well as various types of plants.

When in doubt or when concerned about your furry friend’s diarrhea, give your veterinarian a quick call. Your veterinarian can determine whether the problem is urgent based on the history and description you provide. He or she can also provide the best advice on how you can manage your dog’s health.

Bacterial and Viral Infections

Other worrisome conditions that may lead to loose stool include bacterial and viral infections. Parvovirus, distemper, coronavirus, and bacterial infections such as salmonella are often accompanied by severe diarrhea. If your dog also has a fever, is vomiting, has muscle weakness, and is more lethargic than usual, they may have a bacterial or viral infection. In most cases, infections are highly contagious. This is troublesome in a home with other pets, because of the nature of uncontrollable, explosive diarrhea. Pet parents should make sure to quarantine the affected dog from other pets and be careful when cleaning up any bodily fluids. Some infections can be transmitted to humans as well.

Illnesses or Disease

Additionally, many illnesses and diseases may cause diarrhea. These diseases include but are not limited to:
Cancer of the liver and kidneys
Tumors in the intestinal tract
Colitis
Inflammatory Bowel Syndrome

As you can see, a proper veterinary diagnosis is extremely important if the loose stool persists for an extended period of time (more than one or two bowel movements with a loose, watery consistency). Furthermore, bloody diarrhea is typically a symptom of a disease that is directly associated with the digestive tract and surrounding organs.

Antibiotics or Medications

Immediate Care for Mild Dog Diarrhea However, when your dog has mild diarrhea and doesn’t meet any of the above criteria, the best things to start with are to put your dog on a 24-hour rice-water fast (white rice balls that contain active probiotic cultures) and the oral administration of an intestinal protectant such as kaolin clay and pectin (KaoPectate™) or a suspension containing bismuth subsalicylate (PeptoBismol™). Loperamide (Imodium™) can be given if the diarrhea doesn’t resolve easily; caution is required when using this OTC medication in Collies, and don’t use it for more than five days. (Another caveat: While dogs can tolerate PeptoBismol or KaoPectate, these medications should never be given to cats, as they contain salicylates, which are potentially toxic for felines.)

Anxiety, Stress, or Emotional Distress

We probably don’t have to tell you that dogs are highly sensitive creatures. They experience highs and lows just like humans do. If you have ever felt so anxious that you are physically sick to your stomach then you know firsthand just how a dog with anxiety might feel. Stress can be directly linked to irregular bowel movements that can cause either constipation or loose stools. A good rule of thumb is that if something is stressing you out, Fido is likely picking up on it.

What Your Dog’s Poop Mean

Your dog isn’t exactly able to speak to you, but a lot can be learned from their poop. This article is geared towards the causes and treatment of diarrhea. However, diarrhea isn’t the only unusual type of poop that you may see as a dog owner.

When to Go to the Vet

What is diarrhea? Diarrhea is unformed or loose stools, usually occurring in larger amounts and/or more often. Diarrhea is not a disease but rather a sign of many different diseases. Diarrhea associated with minor conditions can often be resolved quickly with simple treatments. “Diarrhea may be the result of serious or life-threatening illnesses.” However, diarrhea may be the result of serious or life-threatening illnesses such as organ system failure or cancer. Even diarrhea caused by mild illnesses may become serious if treatment is not begun early enough to prevent severe dehydration and electrolyte imbalance.


There are, however, benchmarks that can suggest that you should at least consult with your vet: Other physical symptoms, such as lethargy, fever, vomiting, dry, tacky or pale gums, or weakness; Diarrhea that does not stop despite home remedies that worked in the past; Dehydration; Long duration (Some say a few days, others give more time. This all depends on what is normal for your dog.); Use of medication (a dog on antibiotics, for example); Existing conditions, such as advanced age, diabetes, Cushing’s , cancer, or any medical issue, and When things just don’t seem right. You know your dog, and only you know the subtle signs that something is wrong. Respect your instincts and if you think you need veterinary guidance, pick up the phone.

If any of the following circumstances apply, contact your vet immediately: Episodes of diarrhea are frequently repeated over several hours. Your dog shows extreme lethargy or lack of responsiveness. You suspect your dog has ingested a toxin. You see excessive amounts of blood in the stool (light spotting isn’t necessarily an emergency, but call the vet if it continues). Stool is black and/or has a tarry appearance. Your dog is on medication that may cause diarrhea (stop giving the medication and call your vet). You suspect your dog ingested a foreign body, such as a toy or clothing. Your dog’s gums are pale, white, bluish, or gray in color. Your dog’s abdomen seems painful and/or distended. You see worms in the stool (not an emergency, but a dewormer will be needed). Diarrhea occurs for more than 24 hours. If you’re in doubt, just call the vet. Diarrhea means “flow-through” … from the Greek dia meaning through, and rhein meaning to flow . It’s the body’s way of getting rid of toxins.

Using drugs to suppress this natural flow-through won’t cure your dog of his diarrhea in the long term.

Now … there are times you’ll want to consult a vet to be safe. For example, if your dog is:

Lethargic
Bloated
Vomiting repeatedly
Has a large amount of blood in his stool
Has eaten something dangerous like rat poison
But most acute diarrhea episodes last less than a day or two.

In order to prevent the development of serious conditions, familiarize yourself with the warning signs below.
Warning Signs Include:

Diarrhea that lasts for over 48 hours
Black tarry stool or bloody diarrhea
Loss of appetite Increased lethargy Vomiting
Fever
Dehydration
Abdominal discomfort and/or increased sensitivity in the abdominal region (often seen as whining, panting, excessive drooling, or a distended abdomen –

Note well: If you notice these signs of bloat specifically, please consider this an emergency and take your dog to the vet as quickly as possible, as the condition can be potentially life-threatening.) If you notice any of the symptoms listed above, it is time to see a vet.

How to Stop Diarrhea

Now, you’re likely wondering how to stop Fido from having to use the bathroom so often. There are two main ways to treat diarrhea. The first is to let it run its course. Dogs with acute diarrhea can safely be treated at home. The second is to provide a supplement or medication to ease the issue. Of course, the main thing that pet parents must figure out is the cause of the dog’s diarrhea in the first place. Only then can an effective solution be determined.

A home-cooked bland diet may also be recommended by your veterinarian that often contains a combination of cooked rice or pasta and boiled chicken. This may be more tempting to your dog initially, but is not generally as therapeutic as the veterinary diet. This conservative medical approach allows the body’s healing mechanisms to correct the problem. As the stools return to normal, you can gradually reintroduce your dog’s regular food by mixing it in with the special diet for several days.

Medication for Dog Diarrhea

There are some probiotics and supplements that can be very helpful for dogs experiencing diarrhea. As the quality and effectiveness of probiotics and supplements are not always known, it is always recommended to ask your veterinarian before giving your dog anything of this nature.

Natural Home Remedies for Diarrhea


After a fast, food is usually introduced slowly and many people start with binders, which can normalize stool consistency. Some tried-and-true methods include: Rice water : Boil high-quality rice in a lot of water, remove the grains, and offer the dog the creamy white soup that’s left. A splash of broth or a bit baby food will make it more palatable. White rice Canned pumpkin (plain, not prepared pie filling) has the odd distinction of being effective for diarrhea and constipation . Yogurt , which has beneficial bacteria, can help in dogs who can tolerate milk and milk products. Probiotics , live bacteria that aid digestion (these are also found in yogurt) Boiled potatoes , without skin Cottage cheese Plain protein sources such as egg (prepared with no butter or oil) or chicken (without skin) Herbs , such as fennel, have gut-soothing properties.

Alternative Treatments

Some manufacturers offer foods that can soothe stomach problems. You may need to obtain these from your vet. Over-the-counter medications for humans may also be effective for doggie diarrhea, but should be given with caution and you should talk to your vet before using them. Methods that work for one dog may not help another, so you might need to do a little experimentation to find the right formula. It might also be helpful to write down what works and what doesn’t so you’ll know what to do the next time you find yourself mopping up a mess. Once you find a recovery diet that agree with your dog, and doesn’t cause a relapse, you can slowly increase the portions over a period of days, and then start to add small quantities of your dog’s regular food, until things are back to normal.
If diarrhea is the only sign, a minimum number of tests are performed to rule out certain parasites and infections. If diarrhea is severe or associated with several other clinical signs, your veterinarian will perform a series of tests in order to reach a diagnosis and to determine how sick your dog has become as a consequence of the diarrhea. These tests enable your veterinarian to treat your dog appropriately. Diagnostic tests may include microscopic fecal evaluation, X-rays with or without barium (a liquid given to dogs that shows up on X-rays and can highlight abnormalities in the intestine), blood tests, fecal cultures or DNA tests, biopsies of the intestinal tract, endoscopy, ultrasound, and exploratory abdominal surgery.

 

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